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Coronavirus in Denmark Updates ​

Coronavirus Updates

We will keep you updated on how the Danish lockdown caused by the Coronavirus in Denmark will effect international weddings in Denmark.

If you wish to read more about Coronavirus in Denmark in general terms please visit the Danish Border Police website (in English) where you can see the categorization of countries.

Below we have listed our most frequently asked questions regarding Getting Married in Denmark during the Coronavirus lockdown.

Read more in detail about the new color coded regions below the FAQ

Will the border police make an exception because I'm getting married in Denmark?

Unfortunately, it will not be possible to enter Denmark if you are residing in a country that has the status as highrisk/banned.

International weddings in Denmark are seen as ‘Wedding Tourism

The police issued a statement with a list of reasons why it can be possible to enter Denmark and tourism was stated as not a sufficient reason to enter. 

Is it still possible to process my marriage application during the lockdown?

Yes.

The Agency of Family Law are open during the Danish Coronavirus lockdown and processing applications as well as sending out approvals, however, their staff is working from home
Can I contact the border police to ask if I can enter?

You can call the police’s dedicated hotline regarding entry to Denmark.

The hotline can be reached on +45 7020 6044. The hotline is available on weekdays from 8h00 to 16h00 and on weekends and holidays from 9h00 to 14h.00.
restrictions on the Danish Police’s website here. 

Do I need to get tested before travelling to Denmark?

You must take a test (and be able to show a negative result) prior to entry to Denmark if:

  • You are a non fully vaccinated or non previously infected person. This applies to those residing in Green, Yellow, Orange and Red countries.
  • You are a fully vaccinated person residing in a non-OECD orange or red country.

In these cases you must either take a PCR test no more than 72 hours prior to entry or a Rapid Antigen (lateral flow) test no more than 48 hours prior to entry.

Do I need to take a Covid test upon entry to Denmark?

You are required to take a test upon entry into Denmark if:

  • You are a non fully vaccinated or non previously infected person. This applies to those residing in Yellow, Orange and Red countries.
  • You are a fully vaccinated person residing in a ‘red’ country 
  • You are fully vaccinated  residing in a non-OECD orange country

 

The test facilities are located upon arrival and before passport control. Passengers arriving from a yellow country within EU/Schengen are obliged to be tested upon arrival at the Region H test facility at Parking 5 (P5) after the baggage reclaim area.

If you feel unwell and need to get tested during your stay in Denmark, you can find a testing centre near you by checking the Danish Border Police website HERE.

Do I need a worthy purpose to travel to Denmark?

You are required to provide a worthy purpose for entry into Denmark if:

  • You are a non fully vaccinated or non previously infected person and reside in an orange or red country.*
  • You are a fully vaccinated person legally residing in a ‘red’ country 
  • You are a fully vaccinated person legally residing in a non OECD orange country
  • You have been previously infected with Covid-19 and legally reside in an orange or red country.*

*not applicable to Danish citizens or residents.

You can see the list of worthy purposes on the Danish Border Police website HERE.

Do I need to self isolate upon entry into Denmark and if so, where?

You are required to self isolate upon entry into Denmark if:

  • You are a non fully vaccinated or non previously infected person and you legally reside in an orange or red country
  • You are a fully vaccinated person residing in a red country
  • You are fully vaccinated residing in a non OECD orange country
  • You have been previously infected with Covid-19 and reside in a red country

 

Once you have entered Denmark, and you are required to self isolate, you must travel directly to your self-isolation site. There are no specific requirements regarding the isolation site, including its physical characteristics. It may be a private home, a hotel room, an Airbnb or any suitable facility that allows for accommodation and access to all basic necessities, including food and drink.  

We do recommend contacting any hotels prior to booking to check if they have any specific rules in place with regards to self isolating there, just to be sure. 

You can read the rules on self isolation on the Danish Border Police website HERE.

What is the OECD and which countries are included?

The OECD is The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and there are a number of countries that are a part of this organisation. They are:

Australia

Austria

Belgium

Canada

Chile

Colombia

Costa Rica

Czech Republic

Denmark

Estonia

Finland

France

Germany

Greece

Hungary

Iceland

Ireland

Israel

Italy

Japan

Korea

Latvia

Lithuania

Luxembourg

Mexico

Netherlands

New Zealand

Norway

Poland

Portugal

Slovak Republic

Slovenia

Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

Turkey

United Kingdom

United States

What is classed as an approved EMA (European Medicine’s Agency) Vaccine?

Pfizer BioNtech (Comirnaty) (two doses)

Johnson & Johnson – Janssen Pharmaceuticals (COVID-19 Vaccine Janssen). (One dose)

Moderna (COVID-19 Vaccine Moderna) (two doses)

AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria, formerly COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca) (two doses)

What does fully vaccinated mean?

– You received any of the four vaccines listed in the above FAQ.

– The vaccination was carried out in either the EU/Schengen, Andorra, San Marino, Monaco, and Vatican City, an OECD country or any other yellow third country.

– You are a resident of such a country  (rather than a visitor or a tourist).

– You were vaccinated at least two weeks ago but no more than 180 days ago.

– If your first dose is the AstraZeneca vaccine and your second dose is an mRNA vaccine (Moderna or Pfizer/BioNTech), you are considered fully vaccinated.

– You can document you have been fully vaccinated.

Once the European ‘Corona Pass’ has been introduced, you should be able to use this – full details are yet to be announced.

Update: Monday 17th October, 2021

Update 2021 - Coronavirus/Covid-19

The Danish government has announced that starting Monday October 25, they plan to further relax the travel restrictions. We do not have all the details yet – the political agreement is there, but the final rules are still being fine-tuned – but in a week or so, we should be able to inform you. 
 
 In short, looking at the EU and Schengen area: 
 
 – people who have been fully vaccinated, 
 – people who have previously been infected and 
 – people with a negative test 
 
will be able to travel into Denmark without restrictions. Anyone else will be required to take a test no later than 24 hours after their entry into Denmark. 
 
Looking at the rest of the world: The requirements for a ‘worthy purpose’ to enter Denmark as well as testing prior to entry will no longer apply. As a result, the police’s COVID-19-related border control will also be discontinued. 
 
Apart from that: 
 
– fully vaccinated people from OECD countries, 
– countries on the EU’s positive list, 
– countries that are part of the EU COVID Certificate scheme, 
 
may enter Denmark without being required to take a test and self-isolate.
 
This is different if you are from a country on the EU’s positive list and you are not vaccinated. Then you will be required to take a test after you enter Denmark. 
 
If you travel from any other country than those listed above, you will have to take a test and self-isolate, both after entry. 
 
Before now, the self-isolation period was set for 10 days with the option to shorten it to a period of 4 days by taking an additional test. We are still waiting to see how the isolation period will be defined under the newer travel restrictions.

 

To read further information about the easing of these restrictions, you can see the Danish Border Police website here. 

*Please note: Infection rates will be constantly monitored and any changes to regions will be altered accordingly.  It is your responsibility to keep checking this information to see how it might apply to you.   

Update: October, 2021

Update 2021 - Coronavirus/Covid-19

Each country in the world, and some regions within particular countries, have been classified as a particular colour by the Danish authorities. These are Green, Yellow, Orange & Red.

More specifically,  EU & Schengen countries are being classified as either Green, Yellow or Red

Third countries (i.e. any country outside the EU / Schengen) is classified as either Yellow, Orange or Red.

There are different rules and restrictions in place depending on which ‘colour’ country you are legally residing, whether or not you have been fully vaccinated with an EMA approved vaccine, if you have been recently infected with Covid-19, or whether you can present proof of a recent negative Covid test. 

Residents of OECD countries are also included in the relaxation of restrictions. 

The list of country categorizations is updated every Friday afternoon. You can check to see the status of your country categorization or ‘colour’ on the Danish Border Police website HERE.

On the border police website HERE will see 3 categorization tables showing the colour categorizations and what requirements are in place for each. 

Each table is based on 1 of the following 3 possible travelling situations: 

  • For travellers who are fully vaccinated with an approved EMA Vaccine (you must be able to provide proof of vaccination)
  • For those travelling with a negative test (for those who are not fully vaccinated or are able to show proof they have recently been infected with Covid-19)
  • For travellers who have recently been infected with Covid-19 (and can show proof of this)

 

Depending on which country you are legally residing in and how this country has been categorized, the rules and restrictions vary.  

*Please do make sure to take note of any asterisked sections on each table.   


To read further information about the easing of these restrictions, exactly how each country & region has been categorised, and for a list of ‘worthy purposes’ for entry into Denmark, you can see the Danish Border Police website here. 

*Please note: Infection rates will be constantly monitored and any changes to regions will be altered accordingly. These changes alongside any additional information added to the ‘Phases’ of reopening will occur weekly and it is your responsibility to keep checking this information to see how it might apply to you.  

Update: June 10, 2021

Update 2021 - Coronavirus/Covid-19

CORONAVIRUS, TRAVELLING TO DENMARK AND THE EASING OF BORDER RESTRICTIONS – PHASE 3

This information is renewed regularly as the Danish Border Police release new updates each week.

On 14th May 2021, the Danish government released new and updated rules for foreign travellers wishing to enter Denmark. 

We have set out, as simply as possible, what each of these rules means for each ‘Region’ as well as answering some Frequently Asked Questions (listed above).

This week commencing 7th June, there has been the relaxation of restrictions for fully vaccinated residents & citizens from more than just the European and Schengen countries.

This now includes fully vaccinated residents from: 

  1. The Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development Countries – The OECD for short. 
  2. Andorra, San Marino, Monaco, and Vatican City.
  3. Any other yellow third country.

 

We have included further information about this as an additional section below, with the rules and information contained within.

HERE you find a list of the yellow and red European Union/Schengen countries and regions. If your country is not on any of the two lists, it is orange.

Please note: any country that is NOT in the EU or Schengen is being referred to as a ‘third’ country.

 

OECD COUNTRIES, ANDORRA, SAN MARINO, MONACO, VATICAN CITY AS WELL AS ANY OTHER YELLOW THIRD COUNTRY

If you are a citizen or resident of any of the above listed countries and you are  fully vaccinated with one of the approved EMA Vaccines, then you can enter Denmark, without any restrictions at all.

  • NO worthy purpose is required 
  • NO self-isolation period
  • NO test is required

 

If you are a fully vaccinated Danish citizen, the above will also apply to you when entering from yellow and orange countries or regions.

 

YELLOW REGIONS – EU/Schengen AND Third Countries

If you are legally residing in a Yellow region, both EU/Schengen AND third countries, then you are allowed to travel to Denmark. 

  • You will need to provide proof of a negative test taken no longer than 48 hours prior to entry into Denmark.  
  • You will need to take a test once you have entered Denmark (must be done within 24 hours of arrival). 

 

Please note this is not applicable if:

  1. You are a fully vaccinated EU & Schengen resident
  2. You have had Covid and you can present a positive COVID-19 test that has been carried out at least 14 days and at most 12 weeks before entry then you do not need to present a negative test before nor at entry. You can read more HERE

 

ORANGE REGIONS – EU & Schengen Countries

If you are legally residing in an Orange EU or Schengen country, you are allowed to travel to Denmark. 

  • You must provide proof of a negative test taken no longer than 48 hours prior to entry into Denmark. 
  • You must provide a negative test once you have entered Denmark (must be done within 24 hours of arrival).
  • You must self isolate for a period of 10 days (This self-isolation period can be terminated early if you take a test that proves negative after your 4th day of isolation).  

 

Please note, this is not applicable if:

  1. You are a fully vaccinated EU/Schengen resident.
  2. You have had Covid and you can present a positive COVID-19 test that has been carried out at least 14 days and at most 12 weeks before entry, you do not need to present a negative test before nor at entry, nor will you need to self-isolate. You can read more HERE.

 

ORANGE REGIONS – Third Countries 

For those of you legally residing in a country that is outside the EU & Schengen, you are allowed to travel to Denmark, however, you still need to meet all of the following criteria in order to enter Denmark. 

  • You must provide a worthy purpose for entry
  • You must provide a negative test prior to departure for Denmark
  • You must provide a negative test on arrival into Denmark
  • You must self isolate for a period of 10 days (This self-isolation period can be terminated early if you take a test which proves negative after your 4th day of isolation). 

 

Please note: 

The testing & self-isolation requirements are not applicable if you have had Covid and you can present a positive COVID-19 test that has been carried out at least 14 days and at most 12 weeks before entry.

HOWEVER, you will still be required to provide a Worthy Purpose. You can read more HERE.

 

RED REGIONS  

If you reside in a country that is classed as a red region then you must adhere to the following rules:

  • You must provide a worthy purpose for entry (please note for red regions the list of possible worthy purposes has been greatly reduced)
  • You must provide a negative test prior to departure for Denmark
  • You must provide a negative test on arrival into Denmark
  • You must self isolate for a period of 10 days (This self-isolation period can be terminated early if you take a test which proves negative after your 4th day of isolation). 
  • You are not able to transit through Denmark

 

Please note: 

The testing requirements are not applicable if you have had Covid and you can present a positive COVID-19 test that has been carried out at least 14 days and at most 12 weeks before entry.

HOWEVER, you will still be required to provide a Worthy Purpose and you will still need to self isolate once you reach your destination. You can read more HERE.

 

To read further information about the easing of these restrictions, exactly how each country & region has been categorised, and for a list of ‘worthy purposes’ for entry into Denmark, you can see the Danish Border Police website here. 

*Please note: Infection rates will be constantly monitored and any changes to regions will be altered accordingly. These changes alongside any additional information added to the ‘Phases’ of reopening will occur weekly and it is your responsibility to keep checking this information to see how it might apply to you. 

Update: May 12, 2021

Update 2021 - Coronavirus/Covid-19

UPDATE 12th MAY 2021

CORONAVIRUS, TRAVELLING TO DENMARK AND THE EASING OF BORDER RESTRICTIONS

On the 14th April 2021, the Danish border police announced that they were beginning the gentle easing of the border restrictions which, until then, saw a complete ban on entry into Denmark unless you could prove you had a worthy purpose. 

This general ban has since been replaced by an assessment per region; dividing the world into Yellow, Orange and Red ‘regions’. Each country, or parts thereof, will be categorised into these regions by its number of new infections. 

YELLOW REGIONS 

Yellow regions will need to have less than 20 new infections per 100,000 people each week. If this number goes beyond 30, then the region will change from Yellow to Orange.

ORANGE REGIONS 

Orange regions have MORE than 30 new infections per 100,000 people each week. 

RED REGIONS 

Red regions will be determined on a case-by-case basis. 

The easing of these heavy restrictions will be done in 4 phases and began on the 21st April.

Below we will set out each of these phases, but please note; given these currently reflect an approach, the implementation of the phases may potentially look slightly different in practice. 

PHASE 1 of the easing of restrictions beginning on the 21st April, entry into Denmark will only be possible for those legally residing in Yellow Regions. You will not be required to provide a worthy purpose, you will not need to self isolate upon entry into Denmark, however all testing requirements will remain in place. 

PHASE 2 began from the 1st May. From this time, all fully vaccinated residents legally residing in Yellow and Orange EU and Schengen countries can travel freely in and out of Denmark. 

Important note: Those who are fully vaccinated and legally residing in Orange regions from outside the EU / Schengen, alongside those who are NOT fully vaccinated from within the EU / Schengen area can also travel to Denmark but you must provide a negative test prior to and after arrival into Denmark, provide a worthy purpose for entry into Denmark and self isolate after entry.

You can see more about the testing & isolation rules on the Danish border police website HERE

PHASE 3 is set to begin on the 14th May. Here the incidence levels are expected to change from 20 to 50 for yellow countries (changing to orange if the numbers go beyond 60).

Moreover, it will see those people legally residing in an Orange EU or Schengen country no longer needing to provide a ‘worthy purpose’ to enter Denmark. There will no longer be the requirement for testing prior to entry but will be required to provide a negative test after entry into Denmark and will need to self isolate. 

As per Phase 2, this will NOT be necessary if you have been vaccinated or have had Covid-19 in the past. 

Also in Phase 3, the self-isolation requirement for those entering from a border country will be dropped.

PHASE 4 is expected to begin on 26th June. This phase will see the introduction of the Corona-Pass. For those travelling without a Corona-Pass, the above-stated travel restrictions will continue to apply. 

No further details have been given with regards to this and the government is currently still working on the details. 

To read further information about the easing of these restrictions, exactly how each country & region has been categorised, and for a list of ‘worthy purposes’ for entry into Denmark, you can see the Danish Border Police website here. 

*Please note: Infection rates will be constantly monitored and any changes to regions will be altered accordingly. These changes alongside any additional information added to the ‘Phases’ of reopening will occur weekly and it is your responsibility to keep checking this information to see how it might apply to you. 

Updates, January 25, 2021

Update 2021 - Coronavirus/Covid-19

General Ban

Currently, there is a general travel ban and unless you are Danish, you can enter only if you have a worthy purpose. 

With such ‘worthy purpose’ to enter Denmark in combination with a negative Covid test, taken less than 24 hours before, you can enter Denmark.

The policy for neighbouring regions is slightly different. If you live in such region you can enter if you can document you have a worthy purpose plus a negative Covid test taken during the previous 7 days OR lacking such worthy purpose, you can show a negative Covid test taken 24 hours before entry.  

Worthy Purpose

Unfortunately, a wedding is still not categorized as a so-called worthy purpose to enter. 

You can find the full list of worthy purposes HERE on page 6, which list, by the way, has been considerably reduced, plus there is a specific set of worthy purposes for residents form the United Kingdom and South Africa. Most importantly, you can no longer enter Denmark, travelling together with your Danish partner.

If your partner lives in Denmark, you can still enter Denmark and get married! This is different only when you are from the United Kingdom or South Africa. 

 

 

Updates, November 16, 2020

Coronavirus/Covid-19 and Getting Married in Denmark

We wanted to put together an article for all those couples who are looking to get married in Denmark, to answer all the questions we are getting asked a lot at the moment, specifically to explain what measures the Danish authorities have put into place to keep its citizens and residents safe and most importantly to detail information about whether marriage is currently a possibility during the second wave of this pandemic.

Read the full article here: Coronavirus/Covid-19 and Getting Married in Denmark

 

 

Updates, August 17, 2020

Change in danish COVID restrictions

The 6 nights rule has been dropped 

Today the Danish border police confirmed that it is no longer required to stay at least 6 nights in order to enter Denmark. You can now enter and leave Denmark as a tourist for any period of time you wish.

 

Masks when using public transport

It has also been decided that from August 22 you have to wear masks (any type is fine) when using public transport and this includes trains, taxi’s, busses and ferries. If you wish to read more about these rules click on this link: 

Learn more her (Please notice that the page is in Danish but can be translated with Google Translate from Danish to English)

Updates, June 29, 2020

Danish borders reopen further

As of June 27, borders are opened up to tourists from countries in the EU and Schengen area, as well as the United Kingdom, but please make sure to read the following: 

On this page, there is a link to a PDF, which is updated every week: ‘tabel, der viser det antal ugentlige sygdomstilfælde per 100.000 indbyggere‘. Here you will find a list of countries along with the average infection rate in that country. 

This number must stay under ’20’ in order for residents of the respective country to be allowed to enter Denmark. If at any time the number hits 20 or above, the residents of that country will not be allowed to enter Denmark. 

 
This list is updated weekly and it is your responsibility to keep checking and be knowledgable about your ability to enter Denmark. You can also contact the border police and find more information at the Danish Police website.
 
If you are entitled to enter Denmark, bear in mind that before September, you must stay a minimum of 6 nights in Denmark and be able to prove this at the border. 

Updates, June 19, 2020

Latest Update on Danish borders reopening.

The Danish Government announced yesterday that as of June 27. the borders will be further opened up to tourists from most countries in the EU- and Schengen area, as well as the United Kingdom.

The exact list of countries will be available in June. 25th. As soon we have this list we will update this article. 

Read the announcement here  

As part of the announcement on May 29. Where it was stated that residents of Germany, Norway and Iceland would be allowed into Denmark for tourism, there was one restriction in place that stated they were not allowed to book a stay in Copenhagen and Frederiksberg, due to the risk of gathering too many people. 

However, these restrictions seem to have now been lifted, allowing all tourists to stay in Copenhagen and Frederiksberg. 

Although it has not been written anywhere officially that it is allowed to stay in Copenhagen or Frederiksberg… the rule that it is ’not allowed’ has been removed from the police website. And so, large news outlets have reported this as a sign that it is now allowed to stay in Copenhagen and Frederiksberg.

All tourists entering Denmark must still be able to prove that they have booked at least 6 nights accommodation in Denmark when entering the borders. 

The police has made the following infographic to explain the current entry 

Coronavirus in Denmark Updates ​ - Getting Married in Denmark

You can also read the Rules Regarding entry to Denmark from the police website below:

Want to go on holiday in Denmark 

“If you are resident in Germany, Norway or Iceland, you can enter Denmark for purposes other than those mentioned above in the following situations:

You have booked a holiday stay for at least six nights. It could be a stay in a rented summerhouse, at a campsite or at a hotel. You can also go on holiday in a private home or a privately let summerhouse for at least six nights. You do not have to stay at the same place of accommodation every night, but your stay must last for at least six nights. The requirement of at least six nights does not apply to the Faroe Islands and Greenland.

Relevant documents

Booking confirmation/rental agreement from hotel, campsite or summer house rental agency stating the place of accommodation, the duration of the stay and the names of the persons who have booked the stay.

Proof of a stay in a private home must include information about the location of the home and contact details of the persons entering Denmark and the person(s) letting or lending the home.”

The list of worthy purposes is assessed on an ongoing basis both in relation to entry from neighboring countries and other countries, e.g. in relation to critical illness.

Updates, May 29, 2020

Danish borders Re-opens (Very Slowly)

In today’s press conference the Prime Minister announced the first step for reopening the Danish borders.

The government’s statement was not at all what we expected and we understand that for many – but luckily not all couples – but it will require a lot of changes and adaptability.

We will be emailing all of our couples one by one to provide each of you with information on how this will impact your individual cases this weekend. 

As we need to evaluate each case, we ask for your patience!

In the event you want to read the new rules in detail, they have been published on the Danish Police website. 

We list here the most important rules and restrictions, which enter into force June 15:

Norway, Germany, Iceland

The restrictions will be lifted for travellers who can document (e.g. by a rental document on a holiday home, camping stay, hotel or similar) to stay a minimum of 6 nights outside Copenhagen. 

If the development reverses in the countries, entry restrictions can be reintroduced. 

Travellers etc. will be encouraged on a random basis to take a test for COVID-19 at border crossings. In addition, there will be mobile test stations in the tourist areas, i.a. at hot spots. 

The increased testing is done to monitor the development and discover possible new chains of infection. 

Everyday life in the borderland between Denmark and Germany is to be normalized as far as possible.

 

Later Sweden and Finland

Dialogue with Sweden and Finland on opening. As regards Sweden, the entry restrictions
can be lifted e.g. regionally, provided an adequate model can be found.

There will be a special focus on the Øresund region.

All Other Countries

The list of worthy purposes is assessed on an ongoing basis both in relation to entry from neighboring countries and other countries, e.g. in relation to critical illness.

We will keep a close eye on the above mentioned list of countries and keep this article updated.

The following FAQ is no longer up-to-date

Will the border police make an exception because I'm getting married in Denmark?

Unfortunately, it will not be possible to enter Denmark while the borders are closed if you are not residing in the stated countries. 

The international weddings in Denmark are seen as ‘Wedding Tourism’ see above +  The police issued a statement with a list of reasons why it can be possible to enter Denmark and tourism was stated as not a sufficient reason to enter. 

When will the borders in Denmark open again?

The borders have started opening now and German, Icelandic, Norwegian residents are able to enter under certain requirements.

In an update on the 29th of May, The Prime Minister of Denmark explained that the borders will be closed to other international and European countries until the end of Summer. 

No date was given, but the end of summer is usually September. 

Some countries such as Finland and Sweden will be considered before then.

Is it still possible to process my marriage application during the lockdown?

Yes.

The Agency of Family Law are open during the Danish Coronavirus lockdown, however, the staff is working from home and processing applications as well as sending out approvals. 
 

As they are not operating, as usual, their response time may be delayed.

When will the danish town halls open again?

The Danish town halls have started opening and will be carrying out ceremonies this summer. 

We live in Germany, can we marry in Denmark this summer?

Yes, you can marry in Denmark this summer. You must prove that you are staying 6+ days by showing your booking confirmation and you cannot stay in Copenhagen or Frederiksberg. 

Can I contact the border police to ask if I can enter?

You can call the police’s dedicated hotline regarding entry to Denmark.

The hotline can be reached on +45 7020 6044. The hotline is available on weekdays from 8h00 to 16h00 and on weekends and holidays from 9h00 to 14h.00.
restrictions on the Danish Police’s website here. 

Updates, May 21, 2020

Update on the Reopening of Denmark

The Danish government has announced that they will present a plan of the opening of the Danish Borders before May 31. 

Because Denmarks coronavirus numbers are going down so well, the Danish government also decided to reopen government departments in the whole of Jutland and Fyn, meaning some town halls in these areas of Denmark will return to work. 

As the borders are still not open they can only make ceremonies for Danish couples for now, but at least they can also start preparing for when the borders reopen. 

As soon the reopening plan of the borders has been presented we will update this page and contact our couples with possible solutions. 

Kind Wishes 

The GMiD Team

Updates, May 08, 2020

Danish Lockdown Extended (again sadly)

With May 10 coming near the Danish government has announced the steps it intends to make towards the de-escalation. Sadly, this plan does not include the decision to open the borders again next Monday. 

At this stage, no firm date has been set, although the Danish government and parliament have indicated to respond to the question when travellers are again allowed to enter Denmark, before June 1st.

The Agency of Family Law is going to stay closed longer as well, but they are still working. It is also still possible to apply for the approval to get married in Denmark.  

The Town Halls will remain closed for the time being too, but they are getting prepared to resume the wedding celebrations the earliest possible.

When this happens, the town hall ceremonies will be held respecting all safety regulations to ensure the safety of both couples and staff members. 

We also know that most town halls are contemplating extending the opening hours of the marriage offices and generally will do what’s in their power to help couples get married in Denmark again as soon as possible. 

 

Updates, April 07, 2020

Danish Lockdown Extended

During a press conference held last night on the 6th of April 2020, the Prime minister of Denmark, Mette Frederiksen, announced that Denmark will start to open up again and slowly end the lockdown in phases provided progress continues to go well over the next week. 
 
However, there will be no final exams for Schools and museums, fitness centres and shopping centres will remain closed and gatherings will continue to be greatly limited.
 
Danish Borders, Agency of Family Law and Town Halls
 
The borders will remain closed until the 10th of May, but the Agency of Family Law will be open with office staff still working from home.
 
The Town Halls will remain closed. 
 
This means that couples will not be able to enter the country for their wedding ceremony due to the border closure during this time. 
 
The processing of applications will continue to be slightly delayed while the Agency of Family Law staff work from home. 
 
Town Halls will continue to stay closed. We have limited contact with these and with most of the town halls it’s not possible to book an appointment. 

Updates, April 03, 2020

UPDATE on AFL Re-applications and Fees

We have had an update from they Agency of Family Law today to say that under the extraordinary circumstances, they have decided to give another approval to couples without the payment of the extra administration fee. 

For couples who may not be able to enter Denmark and have your ceremony within the validity period of your approval in Denmark because of the restrictions caused by COVID-19 (restrictions in Denmark only) We are able to request that the AFL reopen your application and give you another approval. 

We will not need to resubmit documentation (unless it is visa/residency please see below) we will just require that you sign a letter from the AFL that confirms the information you submitted in the previous application is still correct. 

An application can only be reopened if the validity period has ended and approvals will not be given out again until the Coronavirus COVID-19 restrictions have ended in Denmark.

Visa and Residency permits
If your visa or residency permit has expired or will expire very soon, you will need to provide up to date proof for legal entry to Denmark and we will need this for the new approval to be granted. 

Updates, March 24, 2020

Town Halls Closures extended until April 15.

The Danish Prime Minister extended the Danish lockdown of all public and private sectors for an additional 14 days to prevent further spread of the Coronavirus in Denmark.

This means that everything in Denmark will stayed closed up until the borders are meant to open again on April 13. 

This means that the Agency of Family Law will also continue working from home after the 30th of March through to April the 13th. 

 

Updates, March 18, 2020

Coronavirus Update: The Danish Agency of Family Law Are Open.

The Danish Agency of Family Law are working and applications are still being processed currently. 

We have been receiving approvals and communication from the Agency of Family Law this week as they are working from home during this lockdown.

We also have been able to speak to them via the main phone line which is available for all international couples. They have a backlog of emails and due to the circumstances, are slightly delayed as expected. 

We at Getting Married in Denmark have been working as usual, we’re here to answer your questions and process your applications as always. 

 

Updates, March 15, 2020

What is a Recognized Purpose to Travel Into Denmark?

The Danish borders are closed  and people wishing to enter Denmark must expect to be rejected at the Danish borders unless they have a recognized purpose for entry.

As seen below the Danish Police state that tourist visits do not constitute recognisable purposes for entering Denmark during the border closure. 

As far as we are aware, international weddings in Denmark are recognised as ‘Wedding tourism’ although we will spend time next week trying to find out whether this is the fact under this scenario. 

According to the Danish Police website a Recognized purposes may be, for example: 

 

– Persons living or working in Denmark, including self-employed persons who work in Denmark

– Persons who must supply goods or services to / in Denmark or goods from Denmark

– Persons who enter for the purpose of exercising access rights with underage children

– Persons who act as primary caregivers for underage children in Denmark (may be, for example, foster families not included in the core family)

– Persons visiting seriously ill or dying family members in Denmark

– Persons entering for the purpose of participating in an ongoing course of treatment with the health authorities in Denmark

– People to attend a funeral in Denmark

-Persons who must attend a trial in Denmark

– Students to the extent that educational institutions are not closed (and no distance education is offered).

 

Regular family visits, tourist visits, business trips, study trips and the like do not constitute recognizable purposes.

Persons who cross the Danish border to return home, for example Swedes who have been on holiday abroad, will be considered to have a recognized purpose for entry. The same goes for transit at the airport and for flight crew.

A person who has a valid, but not yet used, work permit in Denmark will have a worthy purpose for his or her entry, if the person concerned enters to work in Denmark.

 

Agency of Family Law Closed?

coronavirus getting married in Denmark

On the Agency of Family Law website, they are stating that their office is closed between March 12th and March 27th. However, they have also stated to us that we can still write in and put our couple’s applications on hold.

Because of this conflicting information, we’re not sure whether they are open to a certain degree to receive some communication. 

We know for sure, we can’t communicate with them directly by phone, and they will likely not respond to any questions at this stage until their offices are open again. 

We will try and gain further information on this at the start of the coming week. 

Updates, March 14, 2020

Your application and Approval validity period with the Danish Agency of Family Law

The Danish Agency of Family Law has informed us that they will put any applications currently processing with them on hold if we request them to do so.

For couples who have had their application approved and cannot marry within the stated validity period, The Agency of Family Law have reached the decision that they must reapply and pay the usual administration fee that the Agency of Family Law require for applications. 

We understand that for many of you, it will not be possible to marry within the stated validity period of your approval and you will be extremely disappointed with this decision.

It is too soon for us to know how we can help you because of the unpredictability of the situation we all find ourselves in, but we want you to know we will do everything we can to make things easier for you.

International Weddings not Possible During Border Closure in Denmark

The borders of Denmark have been closed until the 13th of April and it will not be possible to travel into the country.

This means that couples will not be able to travel to Denmark for their wedding ceremony During this time.

We had already contacted couples yesterday to let them know that the town halls were closing until the 30th of March and any weddings before this date could not take place. Now, due to the decision to close the borders, weddings after this date and before the 13th of April also cannot take place.

Updates, March 13, 2020

The Danish Boarders are Closing Until
April 13. 2020

Tonight at 19.00 the Danish Prime Minister announced in a press conference that the Danish borders will close until April 13th.

It means that anyone who is not a Danish citizen or a Danish resident will not be able to enter Denmark – unless it is an exceptional emergency.

Today we have contacted all of our couples regarding the situation in Denmark. 

We have also spoken to our couples who are directly effected by the shut down at the town halls until the 30th of March.

This will now also effect all our couples with weddings in the first two weeks of April, we have already spoken to you earlier today and will update you directly again as soon as we have further official information on the matter.

The Apostille Legalisation Office

We have just been contacted by The Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs Apostille Legalisation Office with an update on how the will be operating until March 27.

The Apostille Legalisation Office will extend their opening hours to be weekdays from 9-12 and again from 13.30-15.30. 

There will be a not in the door that tells visitors to check if there are other people in the office and if so stay outside until they come out.

If possible to make a payment online before going to the office that is also recommended as the legalization office only takes sudden credit cards and does not take cash.

We are currently able to carry out our Apostille Service as usual, but there can be cases where UPS and DHL are delayed in other countries.

 

The Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs

The information we are aware of at the time of writing this update is that there are no specific travel bans and only that some airline routes have been cancelled to a number of areas. 

These areas can be found on a map on the danish ministry of foreign affairs where they are highlighted in Red.

This means there are routes that have been cancelled between the Denmark and the other areas highlighted in red. The map can only be found on the Danish language part of their website at the moment.

 

Updates, March 12, 2020

Update from The Agency of Family Law

Based on the potential complications that can occur with delays caused by the Coronavirus and Prøvelsesattestendens validity period of 4 months.

We were yesterday informed by the Danish Agency of family Law (AFL) that pending applications that had not yet received confirmation and therefore had not been issued a Prøvelsesattest, could be extraordinary be set on hold.

We were also informed that they were working on a solution for applications that had been confirmed. 

We have now received an update from the AFL and it will not be possible to extend the validity period beyond 4 months after confirmation.

This means that if a couple has not gotten married within Prøvelsesattestendens validity period, a new application has to be sent off to the AFL as well as a new fee of 220€ has to be paid. 

Over the next couple of days, we will reassess all our couple’s cases and get back to anyone who can be affected by this depending on when the new appointments can be booked at the town halls.

Town Halls Closures

The current update on Town halls are as following 

Copenhagen City Hall – Closed Saturday 13. March (included) until Friday 27. March (included).  

Ærø Town Hall – Closed Friday 12. March (included) until Sunday  29. Marts (not included).  

Kolding – Closed Thursday 11. March (included) until Sunday  29. Marts (not included).  

Frederiksberg – Closed Friday 12. March (included) until Sunday  29. Marts (not included).  

Tønder – Closed Thursday 11. March (included) until Sunday  29. Marts (not included).  

Stevns – Closed Saturday 13. March (included) until Sunday  29. Marts (not included).  

Copenhagen City Hall Will NOT Carry Out Weddings During Lockdown

Copenhagen City Hall has just announced that there are exceptions in very specific cases of emergency and urgent necessity such as terminal illness, heavily pregnant women or people whose visas are about to expire.

These specific cases couples might still be able to get married at the City Hall. 

We have just been informed that Copenhagen City Hall do not see the wedding office as a critical function and will be closing down for all weddings From Saturday 13. Marts (included) until Friday 27. March (included). 

But be aware that the end date can be updated later.

Based on the lates update above, this previous statement form Copenhagen City Hall has been retracted:

The Copenhagen City Hall will continue with weddings. Your wedding ceremony will therefore take place in Copenhagen City Hall.

Though, due to the circumstances of the Coronavirus in Denmark please consider the following with regards to your wedding ceremonial

  • If you feel the slightest ill please cancel your wedding reservation. 
  • Please bring as few guests as possible
  • Be prepared to enter Copenhagen City Hall from the back entrance.

If you need to verify original documents the day before your ceremony, ask the City Hall guard for directions to the Wedding Office at the back door.

The staff of Copenhagen City Hall is still prepared to give you a wonderful experience – like they always do.

If you have any questions to GMiD then please send us an email, and then we will get back to you. Please keep in mind, that we might not answer you as fast as usual due to the sutton change of things.

It is currently not possible to transfer your wedding ceremony from another town hall to Copenhagen City Hall.

Updates, March 11, 2020

Update 12th of March, for Couples Getting Married in Denmark

On the 11th of March, the Danish government announced that they will be closing all kindergartens, schools, and universities for two weeks, as well as asking all none critical government sector personal to stay home. This will make Denmark the second country in Europe to take this action against coronavirus.

We’re not sure if this means that the town halls will be closed from Friday but we will do our best to find out and keep you informed.

This evening we made this video for our couples to keep you informed and to let you know that we are here. We hope to continue making updates for you, please check out our page on our website.

You can call or email to speak to us at any time but please be aware we will be spending much of the 12th of March trying to understand the situation with the Danish government and what it means for you, so we apologies in advance for any delays in getting back to you at this time.

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Coronavirus in Denmark Updates ​ - Getting Married in Denmark